Women who recovered from COVID-19 report their periods have been weird ever since

Women who recovered from COVID-19 report their periods have been weird ever since. Since the menstrual cycle is a key factor in women’s health, when COVID-19 female patients were asked if the virus has affected their periods, the answer was a unanimous yes.

New Delhi: The novel coronavirus infection has infected millions of people all around the world, and has claimed over 1 million lives already. As more and more people have been infected with the virus, information about how the viral infection affects them in the short and long term has come out. 

Women, unless pregnant, have not been placed in the high-risk category for COVID-19 contraction and complications. However, the coronavirus infection is likely to affect their health as well, once they have contracted the virus. Since the menstrual cycle is a key factor in women’s health, when COVID-19 female patients were asked if the virus has affected their periods, the answer was a unanimous yes.

How COVID-19 infection has affected women’s menstrual cycles

Almost all women, across the world, who contracted the COVID-19 infection, agree that the disease has impacted their menstrual cycles in a weird way. The missed periods during the course of the infection, irregular cycles after recovery, heavy flows, abnormally long periods – are some of the ways their menstrual cycle has changed after the infection.

Women’s hormones – estrogen and progesterone, have been found to have a protective effect against COVID-19, which also places women in the relatively low-risk category for COVID-19, as opposed to men. Doctors have also noted that women who are from the menstruating age group and contracted COVID-19, seemed to have milder symptoms, as opposed to others. However, how and why does the infection affect menstrual cycles adversely is still to be found out. According to experts, as the effects of COVID-19 on the endocrine system (the system of the body that regulates hormones) are looked at, the picture is likely to become clearer.

The adverse effect on menstrual cycles could also be because of sickness, reduced physical activity for COVID-19 patients, and the stress of the disease. All these factors can affect how the menstrual cycle operates.
According to a report in Medical News Today, even women who are experiencing long COVID – a condition where symptoms of COVID persist even after one has recovered, are seeing considerable changes in their menstrual cycles. Irregular periods, unusual clotting, and flared up PMS symptoms have been common in women with long COVID. 

Over time, some women have seen their symptoms recover, and their menstrual cycle going back to normal. Menstrual cycles were also affected by the stress of the pandemic, and the various practices such as work from home, that were the gifts of it. Women, ever since the beginning of the pandemic have shared that their cycles have been disrupted, whether or not they have been infected with COVID-19.

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